Wrist

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Smith & Wesson
handcuffs

In human anatomy, the wrist is variously defined as the carpus or carpal bones, the complex of eight bones forming the proximal skeletal segment of the hand; the wrist joint or radiocarpal joint, the joint between the radius and the carpus; and the anatomical region surrounding the carpus including the distal parts of the bones of the forearm and the proximal parts of the metacarpus or five metacarpal bones and the series of joints between these bones, thus referred to as wrist joints. This region also include the carpal tunnel, the anatomical snuff box, the flexor retinaculum, and the extensor retinaculum.

As a consequence of these various definitions, fractures to the carpal bones are referred to as carpal fractures, while fractures such as distal radius fracture are considered fractures to the wrist

It is the most common point on the human body for restraint. Handcuffs are fastened around the wrist to inhibit use of the hands. Handcuffs cannot slide down over the hand (nor up the arm) because they are of larger diameter than the wrist.


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