Tickle torture

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Tickle torture is a supposed form of torture where a victim is subjected to tickling over a prolonged period of time.

Tickle torture involves restraining a person and then subjecting the victim to prolonged tickling.

Toothbrush on feet

Evidence of tickle torture

There is a small number of documented instances of tickle torture. They happened in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In these instances restrained victims were tickled, in all cases upon the bare soles of their feet, apparently against their will and for the pleasure of their tormentors. In one instance the unfortunate end result of tickle torture was the insanity and confinement of the victim, a spouse that the tickle-torturer had found troublesome.


Possible further tickle torture forms

"Chinese tickle torture" is a term used in Western Society to imply an ancient form of torture practiced by the Chinese, in particular the courts of the Han Dynasty. Chinese tickle torture was allegedly a punishment for nobility since it left no marks and a victim could recover relatively easily and quickly.

Another example of tickle torture was used in Ancient Rome, where a person’s feet are dipped in a salt solution, and a goat is brought in to lick the solution off. This type of tickle torture would only start as tickling, and in the end wind up being extremely painful.


The stocks are perhaps a device which gives credence to tickle torture as an actual torture method in that stocks are designed to restrain a person’s ankles, exposing their bare feet, thus allowing passersby to laugh and torture the soles with various methods such as tickling.

Consensual tickle torture

In the world of fetishism, tickle torture may be found as an activity between two partners.

A torture session begins with one partner allowing the other to rope them up in a position that leaves parts of the body particularly sensitive to tickling vulnerable

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