Skirt

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A skirt is a garment that covers the body from the waist to anywhere from the mid-thigh to the ankles depending on length. Unlike trousers or shorts, it is open at the bottom and not divided into separate leg coverings.

In modern western societies it is considered an exclusively female garment (except for kilts worn in a few countries, notably Scotland). It is therefore often preferred to trousers by transvestites and cross-dressers. Conversely, it may be avoided by butch females.

Like other garments, it can be made of fetish materials such as leather, rubber and PVC.

Traditionally, a skirt is considered an article of female clothing, although there are exceptions, such as the scottish kilt.

In addition to being a separate article of clothing, the lower section of a dress or gown is also a skirt.

Basic lengths

Skirt lengths.png

Basic types

Straight skirt or Pencil skirt
a tailored skirt hanging straight from the hips and fitted from the waist to the hips by means of darts or a yoke; may have a kick-pleat for ease of walking
Full skirt,
a skirt with fullness gathered into the waistband
Short skirt
a skirt with hemline above the knee.
Bell-shaped skirt
eponymous to its namesake
A-line skirt
a skirt with a slight flare, roughly in the shape of a capital letter A
Pleated skirt
a skirt with fullness reduced to fit the waist by means of regular pleats ('plaits') or folds, which can be stitched flat to hip-level or free-hanging
Circle skirt
a skirt cut in sections to make one or more circles with a hole for the waist, so the skirt is very full but hangs smoothly from the waist without darts, pleats, or gathers
Hobble skirt
long and tight skirt with a narrow enough hem to significantly impede the wearer's stride

Fads and fashions

Ballerina skirt
a full-length formal skirt popular in the 1950s.
Broomstick skirt
a light-weight ankle length skirt with many crumpled pleats formed by compressing and twisting the garment while wet, such as around a broomstick. (1980s and on)
Bubble dress/skirt
a voluminous skirt whose hem is tucked back under to create a “bubble effect” at the bottom. Popular in the 1950s, 1980s and from the mid 2000s to currently.
Cargo skirt
a plain utilitarian skirt with belt loops and numerous large pockets, based on the military style of Cargo pants and popularised in the 1990s.
Dirndl
a skirt made of a straight length of fabric gathered at the waist
Jean skirt
a trouser skirt made of denim, often designed like 5-pocket jeans, but found in a large variety of styles.
Leather skirt
a skirt made of leather
Kilt-skirt
a wrap-around skirt with overlapping aprons in front and pleated around the back. Though traditionally designed as women's wear, it is fashioned to mimic somewhat closely the general appearance of a (man's) kilt, including the usage of a plaid pattern more or less closely resembling those of recognized tartan patterns of Scotland.
Maxiskirt
an ankle length-skirt (1970s, but has made a comeback in the 2000s)
Midi skirt
mid-calf length. See: 1970s in fashion.
Miniskirt
a thigh-length skirt, and micromini, an extremely short version (1960s)
Poodle skirt
a circle or near-circle skirt with an appliqued (ironed or stiched on) poodle or other decoration (1950s)
Prairie skirt
a flared skirt with one or more flounces or tiers (1970s and on)
Rah-rah skirt 
a short, tiered, and often colourful skirt fashionable in the early-mid 1980s.
Sarong 
a square of fabric wrapped around the body and tied on one hip to make a skirt; worn as a skirt or as a cover-up over a bathing suit in tropical climates.
Tiered skirt
made of several horizontal layers, each wider than the one above, and divided by stitching. Layers may look identical in solid-colored garments, or may differ when made of printed fabrics.
Trouser skirt
a straight skirt with the part above the hips tailored like men's trousers with belt loops, pockets, and fly front
T-skirt
made from a T-shirt, the T-skirt is generally modified to result in a pencil skirt, with invisible zippers, full length 2-way separating side zippers, as well as artful fabric overlays and yokes.
Legwear and footwear with skirts
Popular legwear trends now include skirts with striped tube socks popular with the Rocker style of dressing, skirts with bike shorts or leggings sometimes with lace trim and opaque footless tights, and opaque tights especially in black and also in gray and other colors, and skirts with fun knee socks in styles such as argyle in many colors and solid bright colors. UGG boots; classic sneakers like Converse, Chuck Taylor All-Stars and Keds, flats : and Sperry Top-Siders are popular footwear now with skirts.

Skirts in spanking

A maid's skirt is lifted for a spanking.

A skirt is frequently depicted as being worn by the spankee in spanking art, and described in spanking stories. This is partly because of its status as a traditional article of female clothing, and partly because a skirt can be easily lifted, providing the spanker with easy access to the bottom of the spankee.

Requiring a spankee to holder her skirts up, or to wear them pinned up, exposing the bottom, before or particularly after a spanking (perhaps during corner time) is a common form of humiliation. Punishment clothing often features particularly short skirts. In the Rejuve Universe created by Lurking Dragon, punishment skirts were described as having special button holes and buttons to allow the back of the skirt to be raised and held in place. Other forms of punishment skirts were cut long in front but very short in back, again exposing the bottom.

Female spankers are also often depicted as wearing skirts in spanking art in order to suggest a mature and conservative demeanor.


Related clothing articles - Shorts and Skirts

Clothing as Bondage Bodysuit Catsuit Dress Leotard
Miniskirt Hobble skirt Playsuit Spanking skirt Unitard


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