Disgust

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Primary emotion Secondary emotions Tertiary emotions
Anger Anger Aggravation • Agitation • Anger • Annoyance • Crosspatch • Grouchiness • Grumpiness • Irritation
Disgust Contempt • Disgust • Loathing • Revulsion
Envy Envy • Jealousy
Exasperation Exasperation • Frustration
Rage Anger • Bitterness • Dislike • Ferocity • Fury • Hate • Hostility • Outrage • Rage • Resentment • Scorn • Spite • Vengefulness • Wrath
Torment Torment

Other primary emotions: • FearJoyLoveSadnessSurprise


Contents

Disgust

Disgust is an emotion that is typically associated with things that are regarded as unclean, inedible, infectious, gory or otherwise offensive. For example, "I am disgusted by the stench and sight of that rotting viscera." In The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, Charles Darwin wrote that disgust refers to something revolting. Disgust is experienced primarily in relation to the sense of taste (either perceived or imagined), and secondarily to anything which causes a similar feeling by sense of smell, touch, or vision. Musically sensitive people may even be disgusted by the cacophony of inharmonious sounds. Disgust is one of the basic emotions of Robert Plutchik's theory of emotions. It invokes a characteristic facial expression, one of Paul Ekman's six universal facial expressions of emotion. Unlike the emotions of fear, anger, and sadness, disgust is associated with a decrease in heart rate.

Disgust may be further subdivided into physical disgust, associated with physical or metaphorical uncleanliness, and moral disgust, a similar feeling related to courses of action. For example; "I am disgusted by the hurtful things that you are saying." Moral disgust should be understood as culturally determined; physical disgust as more universally grounded. In The Hydra’s Tale: Imagining Disgust, Robert Rawdon Wilson discusses moral disgust as an aspect of the representation of disgust. He does this in two ways. First, he discusses representations of disgust in literature, film and fine art. Since there are characteristic facial expressions (the clenched nostrils, the pursed lips), as Darwin, Ekman and others have shown, they may be represented with more or less skill in any set of circumstances imaginable. There may even be “disgust worlds” in which disgust motifs so dominate that it may seem that entire represented world is, in itself, disgusting. Second, since people know what disgust is as a primary, or visceral, emotion (with characteristic gestures and expressions), they may imitate it. Thus, Wilson argues, contempt is, for example, acted out on the basis of the visceral emotion, disgust, but is not identical with disgust. It is a “compound affect” that entails intellectual preparation, or formatting, and theatrical techniques. Wilson argues that there are many such “intellectual” compound affects, such as nostalgia and outrage, but that disgust is a fundamental and unmistakable example. Moral disgust, then, is different from visceral disgust, more conscious and more layered in performance.


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Contempt


Contempt is an intensely negative emotion regarding a person or group of people as inferior, base, or worthless—it is similar to scorn. It is also used when people are being sarcastic. Contempt is also defined as the state of being despised or dishonored; disgrace, and an open disrespect or willful disobedience of the authority of a court of law or legislative body. One example of contempt could be seen in the character Ebenezer Scrooge from the Charles Dickens' book A Christmas Carol, who was cold-hearted, hating Christmas and poor people. The word originated in 1393, from the Latin word contemptus meaning "scorn." It is the past participle of contemnere and from com- intens. prefix + temnere "to slight, scorn." The origin is uncertain. Contemptuous appeared in 1529.

Main article: Contempt (emotion)


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disgust


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loathing


-- See main article Hatred

Loathing, hatred or hate is a deep and emotional extreme dislike, directed against a certain object or class of objects. The objects of such hatred can vary widely, from inanimate objects or animals, to oneself or other people, entire groups of people, people in general, existence, or the whole world. Though not necessarily, hatred is often associated with feelings of anger and disposition towards hostility against the objects of hatred.


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revulsion


From Wiktionary
1.abhorrence, a sense of loathing, intense aversion, repugnance, repulsion, horror
2.A sudden violent feeling of disgust.
3.(medicine) The treatment of one diseased area by acting elsewhere; counterirritation.
Antonym
Nounrevulsion
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