Flagellation & the Flagellants

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Flagellation & the Flagellants
Pages 596 pages
Publisher Fredonia Books (NL); Revised edition (May 2001)
Language English
ISBN-10 1589632680
ISBN-13 978-1589632684
Dimensions 8 x 5 x 1.5 inches
Ship wt 1.7 pounds
Buy it from Amazon.com

Flagellation & the Flagellants: A History of the Rod in All Countries from the Earliest Period to the Present Time

The line between pain and pleasure is as thin as the tail of a whip, and this classic work is the definitive history of flagellation through the ages. As it shows, flagellation is much more than a punishment - it is also intimately tied to discipline and eroticism, has a romantic and even comic side, and has also been used for medical purposes. No one is above the bite of the birch or rod - convent nuns were chastised severely, queens have been flogged, and even favorites of the sultan have had to endure the whip in the great seraglios. The author deals in great detail with whipping in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, the favorite parts of the body for whipping, flagellation and discipline in monasteries and convents, whipping in prisons, the rod in Russia, flagellation in America, whipping in Europe and the Far East, the flogging of slaves, military flogging, school punishments, and the birch in the boudoir, all enlivened with colorful anecdotes. There is a chapter on the instruments of whipping, a selection of ribald and erotic poems on whipping, a section on eccentric forms of whipping such as that practiced on prostitutes, many detailed line drawings, descriptive accounts, and a full index. The work shows the fundamental place whipping has always played in human history, both publicly and in private, and continues to play today.

The late Reverend William M. Cooper was an expert on the history of flagellation and discipline.
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